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When you’re pregnant, you need excellent nutrition.  We’ve talked about this several times!  But it’s always good to get an extra boost.  Pregnancy tea can help provide some additional nutrients.  Make no mistake, it isn’t a substitute for an excellent diet, but it is a great addition. There are many different versions of pregnancy tea (including some you can buy commercially; Yogi and Traditional Medicinals make it), but making your own is cheaper, and I think, healthier.

Ideally, you should drink a quart of pregnancy tea everyday.  Sip it throughout the day to help stay hydrated. 

Here is my general recipe:

  • Red Raspberry Leaf
  • Red Clover
  • Nettle Leaf
  • Oatstraw

Mix them all together.  You can use equal proportions or weight one or another more heavily.  You can read about each herb in my post on herbs that support pregnancy.  Talk to your doctor or midwife for more details on which to use and how.

To make tea, put about 1/4 c. of herbs in a quart-sized glass jar.  Pour boiling water over the herbs and put a lid on it.  Leave it overnight.  In the morning, strain it and mix with a little raw honey, fruit juice, or drink it plain.  You could also add lemon, or a little spearmint (herb) to change the flavor.  I happen to like it plain.

This tea supports general female functions, like easing PMS symptoms and promoting milk production, so this tea is something that all women should drink!  (I’ve already started.)

Why not alfalfa?  Well, although it’s high in vitamin K and can reduce your risk of hemorrhage in delivery, it can also potentially cause blood clots in high doses and lupus-like symptoms.  Some say it is dangerous for pregnant women; others say it is beneficial.  I think it is safer to skip it.  If you are at risk for hemorrhage or have low vitamin K levels, it may be wise to add it to your blend in smaller amounts during the third trimester.  Ask your doctor or midwife if this is the case for you.  I wouldn’t recommend it for daily use, though.

Do you drink pregnancy tea?  What’s in your blend, and how do you like yours?


This is the writings of:

Kate is wife to Ben and mommy to Bekah (6.5), Daniel (5), Jacob (3), and Nathan (1.5). She is passionate about God, health, and food. She has written 7 cookbooks and a popular book entitled A Practical Guide to Children's Health. She also recently released Healing With God's Earthly Gifts: Natural and Herbal Remedies, which teaches people to use natural remedies to keep their families healthy. When she's not blogging, she's in the kitchen, sewing, or homeschooling her children.

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22 Comments

  1. In what stages of pregnancy is this beneficial? I thought raspberry leaf tea could cause miscarriage early on. Thanks.

    Reply

  2. I have had three miscarriages due to lupus. The doctors have told me not to get pregnant anymore. I can't find much on the disease. Can you please tell me if you know of any resources. Thank you!!!

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  3. Angie,

    My research (including conversations with herbalists and midwives) tells me it is safe at any time. It relaxes smooth muscles which is probably why some say it could cause m/c but I don't think this is true. Ask your doctor if you're worried, but I think you are safe.

    Laura,

    I'm sorry to hear about your miscarriages. :( I'm guessing that it was the lupus anticoagulant that caused the trouble? i.e. blood clots or blood unable to get through the cord to the baby? In some people, there are dietary things you can do (high dose fish oil being one) to reduce issues and potentially allow you to carry a baby to term. If you would like help researching, please send me a private message. :)

    Reply

  4. With my last pregnancy (6 of 6, one of those was a miscarriage), I drank a blend of raspberry leaf, peppermint, nettle, alfalfa, and something else (it slips my mind as of now). This was at the recommendation of the midwife I saw for nutritional counseling. My kids' doc (he's a natural-minded doc) recommended it as well, but the OB I was seeing for my care didn't like the idea.

    That said, I tried just raspberry leaf tea and it made me cramp a lot. But I could drink about a cup a day of the blend listed above and not cramp. It took 2 months of scary stuff (I thought I was miscarrying again) before we figured out that it was the tea causing the cramps. (Ironically, when I miscarried I never cramped but just bled.) My kids' doc suggested that I needed a homeopathic amount of raspberry leaf, and it did seem to make a difference. My husband says I bled far less with this birth than I did with all the others. This is significant because I nearly needed a transfusion after my miscarriage one year before.

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  5. To someone who is fairly new at alternative medicine/healing, where do you buy these things? These aren't ingredients you just find at your local grocery store. Thanks for clueing me in!

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  6. @ Amanda A really good place to buy herbs is Bulk Herb Store.com but the smallest size they carry is a half lb which of course if you're gonna be drinking them daily for nine mo. i would believe they woudn't be to much. They are really affordable and the website is filled with awesome info on herbs and stuff.

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    • @ Esther, i went to this website and when i looked up red clover it said not for use internally when you’re pregnant………?? i am very hesitant to make this tea if it will be harmful, even if not initially, i do not want my child to be mentally impaired or perhaps physically slow or whatever, even if as small as he is now a B student but would have been an A student if only i hadn’t drank that tea……………

      Reply

      • I promise you your children will not be impaired from the tea. I drank it in my third pregnancy and he was my earliest walker and talker. :) But you can feel free to skip the red clover if you prefer.

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  7. Hi,

    I’m 34 and TTC. I have been taking the Pregnancy Tea from Traditional Medicine, but would like to start making my own. I do have a question about the safety of “red clover” during pregnancy. I have seen some sites advising to stay away if pregnant. I would love to hear your thoughts!

    Reply

    • Hi Elsy, I got this recommendation from an herbalist, though of course there is conflicting information. When in doubt, stick to oat straw, nettle, and red raspberry.

      Reply

      • Hi Kate,

        I’m not sure if you received my previous reply, since I didn’t notice the direct reply link until now. Silly me :-). If you did and you are busy, of course I understand.

        I wanted to thank you so much for the previous response. I’m somewhat of a newbie to your site, but I’m quickly catching up on my reading :-) !

        If you wouldn’t mind, I would enjoy to hear your thought on these items and difference between these and tinctures. I started taking the following from Healthforce Naturals:
        Vitamineral Green (includes Alfalfa Grass, OatGrass)
        Vitamineral Earth (includes Nettle Root, Red Clover Blossoms)

        Also, Is Nettle Root the same as Nettle Leaf in regards to the heath benefits they provide?

        Once again THANK YOU for the truly amazing work you have done and continue to do. !!!!

        Reply

  8. Hi Kate,

    Thank you so much for the quick response. I’m somewhat of a newbie to your site (and our lifestyle), but I’m quickly catching up on my reading :-)!

    In following this line of thought (herbs, teas, etc…) and adding supplements: I started taking the following from Healthforce Naturals:
    Vitamineral Green (includes Alfalfa Grass, OatGrass)
    Vitamineral Earth (includes Nettle Root, Red Clover Blossoms)

    If you wouldn’t mind, I would enjoy to hear your thought on these items and difference between these and tinctures.

    Also, Is Nettle Root the same as Nettle Leaf in regards to the heath benefits they provide?

    Once again THANK YOU for the truly amazing work you have done and continue to do. !!!!

    Reply

  9. I read this post a couple days ago. I have been drinking Yogi’s Pregnancy tea and i go through it so much it has become incredibly expensive. So when I saw your post and checked out what it would be to make it myself I couldn’t believe at how much I would be saving to just buy bulk herbs and make my own. So I did and am now waiting for them to come. Thanks for sharing this! I do have a question though. Is there a recipe for after baby comes for nursing moms to help with milk production?

    Reply

  10. Hi Kate,

    I have been using this blend for a couple of months now, since we are planning on trying to conceive . The only difference is that I have been adding some peppermint for flavor. My problem is that my blood pressure has gone up some. I have felt great and actually been getting up earlier since using it. However when I went to the doctor she said my blood pressure was up a little. This is the only change to my diet other than adding fermented cod liver oil/butter oil.

    I just figured I would check to see if you or anyone else on this blog has heard of any issues with these herbs. I have checked on the internet but have not noticed any connection between any of them and blood pressure going up.

    Thanks, Angela

    Reply

  11. I am kind of frustrated…because the MAM liquid herbal multivitamin was labelled “safe for pregnancy” and has alfalfa in it. I gave some alfalfa tea to a pregnant friend who is new to herbs and had to go back and explain weeks later that it may, in fact, not be safe. Does MAM and MAP have differing views on this issue? I also plan to take the liquid multivitamin during pregnancy and would like some answers. Thank you!!

    Reply

    • It is okay for healthy people. For those who require blood thinners or are at risk of blood clots, alfalfa is NOT okay.

      Reply

  12. I just made the women’s herbal vitamin tincture that was listed in January. If I am doing that should I be drinking the tea too? Or would the multivitamin be enough?

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  13. I came to this blog while searching for healthy food in pregnancy.I found this blog very helpful as i am addicted to tea.All types of tea suggested in this blog are very healthy.I will replace my tea with red raspbery tea.

    Reply

  14. I see you have the recipe here has no amounts of each herb. Then I remembered I got your ebook in a bundle & see there are actual measurements. The only difficult thing when measuring is translating your point (0.) lbs into ounces, which are EASIER to measure. I highly recommend not using lbs but ounces as measurements. 0.3 lb of red clover = 4.8 oz, same for red raspberry leaf, 0.15 lb of oat straw = 2.4 oz, same for nettle & 0.075 lb of passion flower = 1.2 oz. I hope this will help others who want to make this tea.

    Reply

  15. I am very worried about over-doing it with stuff while i am pregnant. I am already taking a good prenatal vitamin as well as 1000mg of extra biotin daily, should I also be taking this tea? even though red clover says not for use during pregnancy???

    Reply

    • You can skip the red clover and use the other herbs instead if it makes you feel more comfortable. I have done it with and without.

      Reply

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