Categories


One question that I get very often is “What vitamin supplements do you recommend?”  Frankly, I can’t fully recommend any brand on the market (although I’m not familiar with all of them; it’s possible some are good).  These supplements have many problems, which make them less-than-ideal solutions for getting the recommended nutrients.  It’s why I am excited to share this recipe for an herbal multivitamin with you today!

Commercial Supplements

These are some of the issues we’re facing with commercial supplements:

  • Many vitamin supplements are made with synthetic vitamins and minerals, which are not well absorbed (around 10%)
  • Many are made with stearates, which bind with the nutrients, making them less well-absorbed (especially gummy varieties)
  • Many are out of balance (certain nutrients “compete” in the body and one prevents absorption of another)
  • Many can be dangerous in isolation, leading to a deficiency of another vitamin
  • They’re not “living” foods, and they don’t come with the enzymes and other factors which increase absorption rates

Honestly it’s really hard to take most vitamins and supplements and do it well.  You don’t know exactly what you need or what you’re deficient in (unless you have expensive blood tests done on a regular basis, but who does that?).  You don’t know if you’re going to cause a deficiency in some other nutrient or if you even need the one you’re taking!

But where does that leave you if you’re concerned?  Sometimes diets are not optimal (in times of illness, stress, pregnancy, or with young children who may be picky eaters).  Our soil is depleted, meaning our foods aren’t as nutritious as they once were.  Besides eating a good diet with a wide variety of foods, how do we ensure our health without supplements?

Herbal Multivitamin

I have an answer for you.   Herbs are extremely rich in nutrients, and since they’re plants, these nutrients are in a balanced, synergistic form.  Adaptogenic herbs are known to help balance and help the body gently, without any side effects (which some herbs can have).  These herbs are safe to take daily, and are well-absorbed by the body.

The best way to take this is in a tincture, specifically a glycerin tincture.  Alcohol isn’t that safe to take daily (especially for children) and doesn’t extract the vitamins and minerals very well.  Glycerin does.  The result, when tincturing, is a super-concentrated herbal multi-vitamin.

This formula is safe for children and pregnant women, and can be used instead of standard prenatal vitamins (in my opinion; talk to your health professional).  It’s very easy and quick to make, and it’s sweet, so children will take it.

The herbs I chose for this formula are rich in the following nutrients:

  • B-vitamin complex (B-1 through B-9, including folic acid)
  • Vitamin C
  • Magnesium
  • Potassium
  • Calcium
  • Iron
  • Phosphorus
  • Vitamin K
  • Manganese
  • Copper
  • Selenium

It’s an ideal way to get your vitamins!  For best results, take it with fermented cod liver oil, so that the fat-soluble vitamins will be properly absorbed.

How to Make It

Here’s the formula (to make one quart):

  • 6 tbsp. alfalfa
  • 6 tbsp. dandelion
  • 3 tbsp. catnip
  • 3 tbsp. nettle
  • 1.5 tbsp. spearmint
  • 2 c. vegetable glycerin
  • 2 c. filtered water

Follow the instructions on last week’s glycerin tincture tutorial.

Basically, add all of these herbs to a quart glass jar, add the glycerin and water, and shake to mix.  Leave it capped for about 6 weeks, then strain.

Easy to take, and very nutrient-rich!

**This post has been entered in Monday Mania at The Healthy Home Economist, Made by You Monday at Skip to My Lou, Homestead Barn Hop at The Prairie Homestead, Motivate Me Monday at Crafts Keep Me Sane, Just Something I Whipped Up at The Girl Creative, Make Your Own Monday at Nourishing Treasures, Real Food Wednesday at Kelly the Kitchen Kop, Healthy2Day Wednesday at Day 2 Day Joys, Wildcrafting Wednesday, Women Living Well Wednesday, Simple Lives Thursday, Things I Love Thursday at The Diaper Diaries, Frugal Days, Sustainable Ways at Frugally Sustainable.**

Do you take a multivitamin?  Would you try a making your own herbal multivitamin?


This is the writings of:

Kate is wife to Ben and mommy to Bekah (6.5), Daniel (5), Jacob (3), and Nathan (1.5). She is passionate about God, health, and food. She has written 7 cookbooks and a popular book entitled A Practical Guide to Children's Health. She also recently released Healing With God's Earthly Gifts: Natural and Herbal Remedies, which teaches people to use natural remedies to keep their families healthy. When she's not blogging, she's in the kitchen, sewing, or homeschooling her children.

Like what you just read? Stay in touch with our newsletter!

Email Format

119 Comments

  1. Never thought of using herbs as a multivitamin! Thanks for the great post!

    Reply

  2. [...] missing anything. But I feel like I’ve got the essentials nailed. I’m considering this homemade herbal multivitamin tincture. But I might still go with some kind of commercial capsule, if I can find a good one. (Nothing with [...]

    Reply

  3. [...] back over low heat and allow it to melt together, about five minutes.  (I made up a batch of my liquid herbal multivitamin while I was waiting on [...]

    Reply

  4. First time I have seen a recipe for an herbal multi-vitamin. I really want to try this in the new year. Thanks for posting.

    Reply

  5. I’m pretty sure alfalfa was one thing WAP doesn’t recommend taking, there is an article in Nourishing Traditions that specifically mentions it not being good for you. Thoughts?

    Reply

    • I think that has more to do with the fact that alfalfa has been approved as a GMO crop. I searched for it and can’t find anything about WAP speaking against alfalfa, and because of its high vit K content and I have heard many recommend it.

      Reply

      • I am also concerned about alfalfa’s estrogenic properties since I’ve had uterine fibroids and other signs of estrogen dominance–would you say the concern is valid? Do you have another herb that you’d recommend in it’s place? And in what proportions? Thanks so much for your help–I am truly in love w this idea!!!:)

        Reply

  6. Also, can I add other herbs? Red raspberry leaf or echinacea for instance?

    Reply

    • You could add red raspberry leaf. I wouldn’t add echinacea because it shouldn’t be used on a regular basis — only during illness. I’d make a separate tincture of that just for times of illness if you wanted. You could add oatstraw. Make sure you stick to adaptogenic herbs and not ones that cause specific effects on the body.

      Reply

      • Ill see if I can find the article on alfalfa, thanks so much! Very helpful :)

        Reply

        • “There is only one seed we do not recommend in spouted form (or in any form) and that is–suprisingly–alfalfa! After mung beans, alfalfa is the variety of sprout that has caught on in the health food world. Unfortunately, it seems that all the praise heaped on the alfalfa sprout was ill advised. Tests have shown that alfalfa sprouts inhibit the immune system and can contribute to inflammatory arthritis and lupus. Alfalfa seeds contain an damino acid called canavanine that can be toxic to man and animals when taken in quantity. (Cavanine is not found in mature alfalfa plants; it is apparently metabolized during growth)” – nourishing traditions
          So is the dried alfalfa mature and therefore doesn’t contain cavanine?

          Reply

          • Right, the mature, dried alfalfa doesn’t have the same issue as the sprouts. Those who have blood clotting issues, lupus, or other known conditions shouldn’t use it, but for others it’s a rich source of vit K.

  7. Hmm… I’m not sold on the use of dried herbs for tincturing. I would use them perhaps but glycerin creates a very weak tincture compared to alcohol. I’ve also never read about glycerin extracting vitamins while alcohol does not. Tinctures are not typically used for vitamins but infusions are. I think infusions are the route to go with these herbs. Using your herb combo and steeping a 4-day infusion (1 quart of infusion, drinking 1 cup per day) would be a better use of these herbs. Another glaring issue is that herbs should be measured by weight and not volume.

    Reply

  8. [...] the herbs off of the Herbal Multivitamin Glycerin Tincture so we can start using [...]

    Reply

  9. My husband is concerned about taking this because, in switching to natural tooth care, we’ve read that glycerin (in toothpaste) coats your teeth and prevents them from remineralizing. Is this an issue in just swallowing the tincture? Otherwise, I think it is a wonderful idea and can’t wait to try it!

    Reply

  10. [...] my herbal on after hitting up a local bulk herb shop by making a fertility tea blend and an herbal multivitamin tincture… next up, homemade neosporin! (Oh, and people seeing this photo on my instagram and thinking [...]

    Reply

  11. [...] the herbs off of the Herbal Multivitamin Glycerin Tincture so we can start using [...]

    Reply

  12. [...] You could also go as far as to make your own – like MAM. [...]

    Reply

  13. Herbal vitamins are very important to us .

    Reply

  14. [...] am also planning to be more consistent with my liquid herbal multivitamin (which I took daily in my first trimester and only randomly since then).  I feel like my [...]

    Reply

  15. How long does the tincture last? I have had quite a few people ask me that!

    Reply

  16. Just wondering if there was anything to replace the dandelion that would be nutritionally equivalent? My husband is allergic to dandelion. Thanks!

    Reply

  17. I made this quite a while ago, but it BURNS like liquor going down, what’s up with that?????

    Reply

  18. [...] in just a minute), light exercise, enough sleep, and taking fermented cod liver oil and perhaps an herbal multi-vitamin are recommended.  The idea is that your body should be optimally healthy and not deficient in [...]

    Reply

  19. I have purchased all of the ingredients to make this tincture, but I had a few questions. Is this safe for nursing mothers? I assume that it is since it is safe for pregnant women. I sort of thought that any kind of mint would dry up your milk, should I leave out the spearmint if I am nursing?
    Thanks!

    Reply

    • Yes, I take it while nursing. Some women find that mint affects their supply; others don’t. I haven’t had an issue. You could try a small amount of mint tea a couple times to see if it’s likely to affect you, then decide if you want to leave it out or not.

      Reply

      • Thanks! I might just leave it out for now, my baby is just 6 weeks old and I want to make sure he’s gaining as much weight as possible. I will definitely be making this tincture soon. I’m tired of taking expensive supplements that aren’t properly absorbed anyway!

        Reply

  20. What is the dosage for this? I’ve made it and it’s definitely helping my energy level, but I really don’t know how much I should be taking.

    Reply

  21. From what I read catnip isn’t safe when pregnant… It can cause uterine contractions (miscarriage, premature labour etc) are there any other herbs that have similar nutritional value that are safe when pregnant?

    Reply

    • Catnip is in the mint family, and any mint is “iffy” while pregnant. I used it (all mints) because I have no history of complications. If you are worried, you can skip both the catnip and the spearmint and try oatstraw. If you have no issues, using them in small quantities this way should be fine.

      Reply

  22. Just wondering what the dosage would be for this.

    Reply

  23. This is such wonderful & helpful information to Vegans. I will be preparing mine with Apple CIder Vinegar instead of alcohol or glycerin. Thank you so much for taking the time to put together this information for the world!

    Reply

  24. I cannot wait to try this recipe!! I just wanted to know if it is dandy lion leafs or flowers or roots??? Thanks

    Reply

  25. I’m curious if you could mix this up dry and brew it as a tea? If steeped for 10-15 minutes and consumed daily, would you still get the benefits? We drink a lot of tea and it seems like it would be more enjoyable than 3 T of glycerin or other tincture medium. Thoughts? Thanks!!

    Reply

    • Hi Jillian,

      Sure, you could use it as a tea. It wouldn’t be as potent, but you can. I like the glycerin personally but feel free to try whatever makes the most sense to you! Have you thought of a decoction? That’s where you boil the herbs for 20 – 30 minutes. So it would be really strong.

      Reply

  26. […] of this I was super happy when I saw Kate’s, from Modern Alternative Mama, post about a herbal multivitamin tincture. Kate knows her stuff, and I got to tincturing. The mix of herbs provide a nice assortment of […]

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>



Back to Top