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Today we have a guest post from Katie at Mexican Wildflower.  She’s going to tell us all the awesome uses for lavender.  Thanks, Katie!

Lavender is a wonderful medicinal and culinary herb. It is a hardy plant that flourishes in dry, sandy, well drained or gravely soils in full sun making it hard to kill. Lavender is great for the amateur gardener who wants to start growing their own herbs. If you don’t want to grow your own lavender there are great companies like Bulk Herb Store or Mountain Rose Herbs where you can buy dried organic lavender flowers for a reasonable price.

When people think of lavender, normally soothing scrubs, sachets and soap (that help us relax and sleep better at night) come to mind. There are so many other uses for lavender. Why limit yourself to a couple things when you can heal, relax, cook and clean with lavender?

Here are some ideas to incorporate lavender into daily life:

Medicinal/ Personal Care

Cooking

Cleaning

Image by Clownfish

Pain Be Gone Tincture/Glycerite

2 parts white willow bark
1 part dried lavender flowers
Vodka or food grade glycerin
Glass jar

Vodka Method:

Mix herbs together filling a glass jar 3/4 of the way full. Cover with vodka and give it a good shake. Store in a dark place, such as a cabinet, for at least four weeks, shaking every day. Strain through a cheesecloth or old t-shirt, squeezing out as much liquid as possible. Store in a glass jar and keep in a dark location. The tincture will retain it’s potency for at least two years.

Glycerin Method 1:

Mix herbs together filling a glass jar 3/4 of the way full. Pour just enough hot water over the herbs to dampen them. Fill the jar with glycerin and give it a good shake. Store in a dark place, such as a cabinet, for at least six weeks, shaking every day. Strain through a cheesecloth or old t-shirt, squeezing out as much liquid as possible. Store in a glass jar and keep in a dark location. The glycerite will retain its potency for at least one year.

Glycerin Method 2:

Mix herbs together filling a glass jar 3/4 of the way full. Pour just enough hot water over the herbs to dampen them. Fill the jar with glycerin and give it a good shake. Place a towel in the bottom of a crock-pot, nesting the jar in the towel. (This is to prevent the jar from breaking.) Add water until just an inch of the jar remains uncover. Cover and cook on warm or low for three days. Strain through a cheesecloth or old t-shirt, squeezing out as much liquid as possible. Store in a glass jar and in a dark location. The glycerite will retain it’s potency for at least one year.

How do you like to use lavender?

 

My name is Katie Stanley, I was born in St. Joseph, Missouri, raised in the Central Valley of California and have lived in northern Baja California, Mexico since I was 19. I am a daughter of God and a follower of Jesus. Who is my first true love, I strive to glorify him in all that I do.

I moved to Mexico in August of 2004 as a laundry lad and then dorm mom to sixteen deaf girls at Rancho Sordo Mudo, a Christian boarding school.

I was a homeschooler until the age of fifteen when I started attending a Christian high school. I have never gone to college but am a continual student of the Bible, herbs, nourishing living and how to be a woman after God’s own heart.

To learn more, visit Mexican Wildflower.


This is the writings of:

Kate is wife to Ben and mommy to Bekah (5), Daniel (4), Jacob (2), and Nathan (born March 2013). She is passionate about God, health, and food. She has written 7 cookbooks and a book entitled A Practical Guide to Children's Health. When she's not blogging, she's in the kitchen, sewing, or homeschooling her children. You can also find her as a contributor at Keeper of the Home.

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9 Comments

  1. How do you use the Pain Be Gone mixture? I assume you take it internally, how much, how often, etc. It looks very interresting to me so I’d love to know those details. Thanks!

    Reply

    • I take 1/2 a teaspoon (or 30 drops) internally every few hours until the pain subsides. For children under age 16 it is not suggested that you use white willow bark because it contains salicin which is what aspirin used to be made of. I have given this to my girls 6 and up on occasion in a much smaller dosage, about 1/8 a tsp. As always it is best to do your own research to find out what is right for you and your family. Rosemary Gladstar’s book Herbal Recipes for Vibriant Health has a wealth of information about herbs and their dosages. If you want to give this to your children you could always make it with out the white willow bark or substitute peppermint or chamomile for a soothing effect.

      Reply

  2. I love lavender! I really love lavender oil for relaxation…. ah. It is one of my favorite herbs

    Reply

  3. [...] Tinctures (Immunity Boosting Tincture and Pain Be Gone Tincture) [...]

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  4. [...] more about the many uses for lavender, and tell me how you like to use lavender in your home! #ssba img { padding: 10px; border: 0; [...]

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  5. I made some lavender tincture. Can you give me suggestions on how to use it? Thank you!

    Reply

  6. […] I have had a rough day, or am particularly wired, I always apply lavender essential oil or the Serenity blend from doTerra on my feet and on my temples. Both help me relax and fall asleep […]

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  7. […] more sleep! (oh, it won’t fit in the medicine chest? ok, what else can we try?…)  tincture of lavender & white willow bark; candied ginger; temple rub of lavender oil (essential oil mixed with carrier oil such as coconut […]

    Reply

  8. […] cook and clean with lavender?   To learn ways to incorporate lavender into your daily life head Modern Alternative Mama to read the rest of the […]

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