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This is a guest post by Katie Stanley of Nourishing Simplicity.  For the months of March and April, you will see a lot of guest posts as MAM awaits and then enjoys her new baby!

Let’s face it, “that time of month” is generally not something most women look forward to. Cramping, bloating, diarrhea and unbalanced hormones that are not exactly what fun times are made of.

Before you pop a pain pill and check out of existence for the next week consider the amazing God given herbs that were made to heal, sooth and balance your body.

I was one of those women that turned to pain killers every month to ease the horrible cramps that I experienced. A few years ago I started making my own cramp tincture. After doing some research I came up with a herbal blend that has done wonders for myself, my daughters and some friends. 

The herbs you will find in this cramp tincture are good for releaving cramps and nausea, sooth the colon, mood boosting and decrease profuse menstrual flow. It contains essential vitamins, minerals and nutrients for menstruating women  such as magnesium, calcium, potassium, phosphorus, iron   vitamin C, E, A and B complex.

Cramp Tincture/Glycerite

1 Part Lemon Balm
1 Part Catnip
1 Part Oatstraw
1 Part Red Raspberry Leaf
1 Part Yarrow
1 Part Peppermint
1 Part Dried Ginger
Vodka or Vegtable Glycerin
Hot Water (if using glycerin)

Vodka Method:

Mix herbs together filling a glass jar 3/4 of the way full. Cover with vodka and give it a good shake. Store in a dark place such as a cabinet for at least four weeks. Shaking every day. Strain through a cheese cloth or old t-shirt, squeezing out as much liquid as possible. Store in a glass jar. The tincture will retain it’s potency for at least two years. Store in a dark location.

Glycerin Method 1:

Mix herbs together filling a glass jar 3/4 of the way full. Pour just enough hot water over the herbs to dampen them. Fill the jar with glycerin and give it a good shake. Store in a dark place such as a cabinet for at least six weeks. Shaking every day. Strain through a cheese cloth or old t-shirt, squeezing out as much liquid as possible. Store in a glass jar. The glycerite will retain it’s potency for at least one year. Store in a dark location.

Glycerin Method 2:

Mix herbs together filling a glass jar 3/4 of the way full. Pour just enough hot water over the herbs to dampen them. Fill the jar with glycerin and give it a good shake. Place a towel in the bottom of a crock pot, nesting the jar in the towel. (This is to prevent the jar from breaking.) Add water until just a inch of the jar remains uncover. Place on the lid and cook in warm to low for three days. Strain through a cheese cloth or old t-shirt, squeezing out as much liquid as possible. Store in a glass jar. The glycerite will retain its potency for at least one year.

Once strained store tincture in a glass jar or dropper bottles in a dark place. Vodka and apple cider tinctures will last for several years. Glycerin tinctures should be used within two years.

Suggested Dosage Guidelines

I like to take this tincture three times a day for a couple day before my cycle starts. It is beneficial to your body even if you do not have cramps.

If you are experiencing cramps you can take this every two hours for the entirely of your period.

This is the dosage that I normally use:

9-12 years: 25 drops
12- adult: 35 drops (1/4 tsp) to 88 drops (1/2 tsp)

Take the tincture by itself, in a glass of water or in a cup of tea. Some find this tincture more effective when taken in warm water.

As with anything take the weight of the individual into consideration. You may have a heavier 12 year old or be a small woman. Ultimately if you are in question do some research and do what you believe is best for you and your family.  These are just suggestions. Herbs are a medicine, more is not better.

Note For Nursing Women:

Catnip, lemon balm, peppermint and yarrow have been known to decrees milk supply in nursing mothers. You may want to consider leaving these out if you are nursing.

Red Raspberry Leaf on the other hand can increase milk production. Some say the oatstraw does as well.

 For Further Reading

 How do you treat cramps naturally?


This is the writings of:

Kate is wife to Ben and mommy to Bekah (6.5), Daniel (5), Jacob (3), and Nathan (1.5). She is passionate about God, health, and food. She has written 7 cookbooks and a popular book entitled A Practical Guide to Children's Health. She also recently released Healing With God's Earthly Gifts: Natural and Herbal Remedies, which teaches people to use natural remedies to keep their families healthy. When she's not blogging, she's in the kitchen, sewing, or homeschooling her children.

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15 Comments

  1. I was wondering how you use it? I don’t see it mentioned anywhere.

    Reply

  2. Is this safe to take while nursing? Like immediately PP?

    Reply

    • Suggested Dosage Guidelines
      I like to take this tincture three times a day for a couple day before my cycle starts. It is beneficial to your body even if you do not have cramps.

      If you are experiencing cramps you can take this every two hours for the entirely of your period.

      This is the dosage that I normally use:

      9-12 years: 25 drops
      12- adult: 35 drops (1/4 tsp) to 88 drops (1/2 tsp)

      Take the tincture by itself, in a glass of water or in a cup of tea. Some find this tincture more effective when taken in warm water.

      As with anything take the weight of the individual into consideration. You may have a heavier 12 year old or be a small woman. Ultimately if you are in question do some research and do what you believe is best for you and your family. These are just suggestions. Herbs are a medicine, more is not better.

      Note For Nursing Women:

      Catnip, lemon balm, peppermint and yarrow have been known to decrees milk supply in nursing mothers. You may want to consider leaving these out if you are nursing.

      Red Raspberry Leaf on the other hand can increase milk production. Some say the oatstraw does as well.

      Reply

  3. If you’re in a time pinch, you can simply brew some red raspberry leaf tea. A cup or two always work for me. Simple!!

    Reply

  4. I am ordering from Mountain Rose right now, so excited to try this! I am usually popping so much advil because it’s the only way I can survive, but I’d LOVE to not do that to my liver.

    Can you offer some insight into dosage? e.g., how many drops (or teaspoons?) would you take? How often? For what duration? Does it help to start a couple of days before the onset of your period? Or just when you have discomfort? What do you do? Thank you!!

    Reply

  5. So if I have made this…then what do I with it? Drink it? Sniff it? Rub it on my big toe? A little more info would be helpful! :)

    Reply

  6. What’s the application for this? Dosage? What are you supposed to do with it once it’s ready? Not everyone is familiar with tinctures….a little instruction would be nice :)

    Reply

  7. How much do you recommend taking?

    Reply

  8. What do we do with these tinctures, drops in hot tea or I would think the glycerin versions might make a nice warm compress? How much, how often, and how :D

    And I second what Magda said–I brew some leaf of the red raspberry bush tea(I have found that if I say “red raspberry leaf,” that most people hear “red raspberry,” which tastes nice but doesn’t have the happy and calming effects for which I take the leaf tea), and the longer I let it steep, the better. In fact, I often will brew it while I’m making dinner, keep it on a warmer, and then let it continue to sit overnight then drink it in the morning. I have found that “brewing” it for 12+ hours gives me maximum benefit.

    I can’t wait to try the tinctures!

    Reply

  9. [...] me at Modern Alternative Mama where I am guest posting to learn how to make Cramp Tincture.   Filed Under: [...]

    Reply

  10. Which method do YOU use? Are they all just as beneficial? And yes, dosage directions, please. :)

    Reply

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